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Messages - Johannes @ Robots in Architecture

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1
Support / Re: KRC2 will not master all of the sudden
« on: Today at 07:32:51 PM »
The ancient solution to at least 25% of all problems ;)
An unmastered robot cannot move in Cartesian mode, so you do not have to worry about that. If the robot loses its calibration (e.g. if it is mishandled while shut down, and the axis position from before the shutdown do not match up with the current position) you will get an error message.
However it is strange that it forces you to master all axes, I believe that I always had to manually unmaster an axis, if I wanted to master an axis that the robot considered to be correctly mastered.
If your robot is always unmastered after you power it on for the first time, there is probably an issue with your RDW.

Best,
Johannes

2
The power draw depends on the robot, but the fuses for KRC4 should be 3x25A according to the manual. A 32A plug should be fine.
For the spindle it's easier, because you know the kW anyway. So with a 9kW spindle you may want to take a 12kW inverter, so at 380V you're looking at a 32A requirement. More than 32A are not that common in non-industrial buildings, at least around here.

The most common problem we nearly always encounter when setting up a robot somewhere new, is the circuit breaker, which should work at 0.3A, rather than the more common 0.03A. Otherwise the robot will start, but once you try to move it the circuit breaker will trigger. Of course, 0.3A are more dangerous, so be particularly careful around any such outlets.

That being said, I'm not an electronics expert, so double-check whatever I'm writing.

Best,
Johannes

3
General Discussion / Re: Using kuka 210 to carve in marble - Total costs
« on: December 12, 2017, 06:09:53 PM »
That spindle was massive, at least 16kW on a KUKA Titan robot. But I don't really think that such a high-end solution is really a requirement in most cases - we have milled wood quite successfully with a 6kg payload robot and a 150EUR spindle ;)
Then again, it seems that spindles don't get that much more expensive with increasing power. At my lab, the limit was actually the power supply as the electrician could not guarantee that our "grid"  could take two robots plus the spindle, so we had to downscale it to ~8kW.

Best,
Johannes

4
Support / Re: KUKA PRC Dynamo Error
« on: December 12, 2017, 06:02:50 PM »
Hello,

I don't have an overview of all common Dynamo error messages yet.... Which version of KUKA|prc for Dynamo did you test?
Current is the KUKAprc_Dynamo_11_27_2017.exe version of the installer.
Also make sure that no older libraries are installed as they might cause issues.

Let me know about the software versions, then I can continue giving you tips to find the problem!
Best,
Johannes

5
General Discussion / Re: Using kuka 210 to carve in marble - Total costs
« on: December 11, 2017, 05:49:20 PM »
All the best with the project!
But do consider that prices - in general - may be higher in Australia. I can only speak from my experience in Austria (!). So if you get a higher quote, it does not necessarily mean that someone is trying to rip you off ;)

Best,
Johannes

6
Support / Re: Optimising process sequence
« on: December 11, 2017, 05:34:42 PM »
Hello,

There are more or less complex sorting algorithms and I'm pretty sure some component should exist for that. Attached is a very simple optimization strategy that simply creates a zig-zag polyline all over the working area and then sorts the individual curves according to the parameter of their closest point on the zig-zag curve.
It's quite straightforward and here it optimized the toolpath from 42m down to 19m.

Best,
Johannes

7
Support / Re: KRC2 will not master all of the sudden
« on: December 11, 2017, 05:22:45 PM »
Hello,

You can simply "fake-master" it by choosing the other calibration option. However I cannot quite remember its English name at the moment, in German it's (Mess)Uhr. But it's the option next to EMD/EMT and assumes that you screw on a dial gauge to manually find the deepest notch.
I've actually been OK by calibrating it "manually", simply by pushing with some piece of metal aligning edge and notch by sight - where possible - and where it is hidden by having someone else move the robot while you feel for the notch. Of course that's not ideal, but it gets the robot moving again if you do not need the highest accuracy.

Best,
Johannes

8
General Discussion / Re: using kuka 210 to carve in marble
« on: December 10, 2017, 03:28:53 PM »
Hello Jim,

I can't answer all your questions, but I'll try to cover as much ground as possible. Basically a larger milling spindle is going to weigh around 30kg, so all the robots that you suggested can support it. However, there are dynamic forces happening, and the stiffer the robot, the more accurate the toolpath will be. So I would definitely go for the heaviest robot you can get. You don't really need the speed anyway. Turntables are nice, and 1ton should not be a problem for most turntables. Note that you need a turntable with a KUKA motor, if you want to move it synchronized with the robot.
Costwise you are probably looking at around 20k EUR for a used robot with turntable, if you buy it from KUKA with warranty it's more like 30k EUR and new 95k EUR - or at least somewhere in that neighborhood. It obviously depends on the age, operating hours etc. Global Robots in the UK build affordable turntables out of old KUKA motors, and also sell used robots - you could get in touch with them.
A nice spindle from HSD will be around 4k EUR, with another 1k for the inverter, plus at least another 2k for your accessories and smaller stuff like cables.
Don't forget that you may need extra safety equipment (fence, special doors...), and possibly pay someone to certify the installation, if legally necessary.

Software-wise there is a large range to choose from - from software like Autodesk Fusion 360 which is nearly free, to integrated robot milling solutions that will cost more than your robot.

Personally I like using Autodesk Fusion at university, because all the students can use it for free, and it's easy to learn with a large community. You cannot simulate a robot, but you can export the toolpaths into KUKA|prc/Grasshopper and then simulate the robot movement.

SprutCAM is probably the cheapest way if you want to use a single software environment. Note that in some cases you will also need to pay for the integration of your robot model etc.
High-end solutions that I've seen used with robots are HyperMill (with KUKA CAMRob for the robot), PowerMill (with PowerRobot) and MasterCAM (with RobotMaster).
That being said, while we have worked with granite and sandstone before, I don't have any experience with milling marble and cannot tell you which software will be best suited. The last stone company we worked with used HyperMill.
But you could get started with a cheap software like Fusion, and once you are earning money with it, upgrade to a more professional solution.

I cannot really recommend you an integrator in Australia, my suggestion would be to get in touch with the universities in Sydney that are using KUKA robots and ask for their experiences, e.g. contact the architectural fabrication labs at UNSW, USydney and TU Sydney. Maybe they can also provide some knowledge transfer - I often have companies at my lab that want to get a brief into robotics, which often results in nice research projects.

And of course get in touch with KUKA Australia, they will also be able to point you towards integrators and may have used robots in stock themselves.

Hope that helps!
Best,
Johannes


P.S.: I slightly edited your titel by adding "total costs" to make the conversation easier to find for people who might be looking for similar information, but not for marble.

9
Support / Re: KRC2 will not master all of the sudden
« on: December 10, 2017, 02:50:27 PM »
Hello,

Hmm.. That is strange - as you have mastered the robot before, I guess that the notches are properly aligned. Have you tried it with more axes, just to check that there is not e.g. something stuck with a single axis?
If you have made a backup of the robot before, I would load that, just to make sure that it's not a software issue. With KRC4 you could simply load an old project, but that doesn't exist for KRC2.
I'm pretty sure that the connection on the KUKA did lock, have you looked into the plug if any pins are bent?

Best,
Johannes



10
Support / Re: KUKAprc collision checking not working
« on: December 05, 2017, 07:57:38 AM »
Hello,

Please note that KUKA|prc is doing collision detection and not collision avoidance. The problem with avoidance is that it is highly application-dependent. In some cases like milling it might be possible to simply tilt the tool, in other cases tilting a gripper might be the completely wrong thing to do. If you want to do avoidance yourself, the easiest way is that you do an initial simulation that outputs which positions are causing collisions through the (member-only) Analysis component, and then you create your own algorithm on how to deal with it, e.g. tilting a plane, removing the position altogether etc.

Hope that helps!
Best,
Johannes

11
General Discussion / Re: Question regarding new custom tool
« on: December 04, 2017, 08:55:49 PM »
Having a modular extension would definitely make sense for some applications, you could even split your job in half, depending on the distance.
Looking forward to seeing it in action!
Best,
Johannes

12
General Discussion / Re: Question regarding new custom tool
« on: December 04, 2017, 08:11:12 AM »
Hello,

I would assume a 4kW spindle to be around 20kg, so even with a 600mm extension it will be well within the 140kg payload of your robot.
That being said, having the long extension could make 5-axis milling more complicated, as the robot will have to move quite much in the "back" in order to tilt the tool in the "front".
I think that I've used tool values of well over 1000mm before, so I don't see a software limit there.

Best,
Johannes

13
Support / Re: Suspended KUKA
« on: November 28, 2017, 07:55:03 AM »
Hello,

To check if the base is synced, you would usually just switch into a Cartesian movement mode (e.g. World), then switch to the external axis and move it. If everything is working, the tooltip should stay in place, while the rest of the robot is moving along the rail. On the other hand, if you move the E1 in the Axis movement mode, only the rail will move, while the robot will stand still.

We generally implement new external axis systems for academic members for free, so they would just need to become members.
Time-wise I cannot give you a reliable estimate, it takes a bit of time doing it, but the main challenge is finding time to do it in the first place ;)
Until when would you need it?

Best,
Johannes

14
Support / Re: Suspended KUKA
« on: November 27, 2017, 10:25:56 PM »
Hello,

That looks like a nice setup there! Is the rail synced, or not using a KUKA motor?
We would need to integrate the rail, though you can also just use the generic rail to get started, if you don't mind it being much too large.
in any case, it seems as if the ROBROOT is flipped, you can do that in PRC e.g. via the Custom Robot component.
See the example attached below!

Best,
Johannes

15
Support / Re: kuka|prc compatible with krc1?
« on: November 24, 2017, 03:55:13 PM »
Hello,

Just be careful that the mastering position is not the position where the painted notches meet, but when you push in the metal pin behind the cap, it will move along a path that looks like that looks like a V. The axis is mastered when the pin is at the deepest position (generally in negative direction from the painted notch, if I remember correctly).
If I don't have an EMD, I usually just gently push against it with a plastic stick or pen and do it "by touch".

For the tool and base calibration, refer to the handbook and http://forum.robotsinarchitecture.org/index.php/topic,115.0.html

Best,
Johannes

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